Violent porn banned

Last year I reported on the government proposal to ban violent internet porn and I can now confirm that the silly fucks went ahead with it.

Link

A mother whose daughter died at the hands of a man obsessed with violent internet porn has won her fight for a ban on possessing such images.

The government has announced plans to make the possession of violent porn punishable by three years in jail.

It follows a campaign by Berkshire woman Liz Longhurst whose daughter Jane, a Brighton schoolteacher, was strangled by Graham Coutts.

Mrs Longhurst’s campaign was backed by MPs and a 50,000-signature petition.

Hidden body

In November last year the petition won cross-party support when it was presented to the House of Commons and was backed publicly by the solicitor general, Harriet Harman MP.

Since her daughter’s death Mrs Longhurst, 74, from Reading, has fought a long campaign to ban the possession of images of sexual violence.

Mrs Longhurst said: “My daughter Sue and myself are very pleased that after 30 months of intensive campaigning we have persuaded the government to take action against these horrific internet sites, which can have such a corrupting influence and glorify extreme sexual violence.”

Jane Longhurst, 31, was found dead on Wiggonholt Common, near Pulborough, West Sussex, on 19 April 2003.

She had been strangled with a pair of tights and her body kept in storage for weeks before it was found.

In 2004, musician Coutts, 36, of Waterloo Street, Hove, West Sussex, was jailed for life for her murder but on appeal the minimum term he was ordered to serve was reduced from 30 to 26 years.

Trial jurors had been told of his obsession with strangulation and how he looked at internet sites connected with the fetish.

It is already a crime to make or publish such images but proposed legislation will outlaw possession of images such as “material featuring violence that is, or appears to be, life-threatening or is likely to result in serious and disabling injury”.

Home Office Minister Vernon Coaker MP said: “Such material has no place in our society but the advent of the internet has meant that this material is more easily available and means existing controls are being by-passed – we must move to tackle this.”

Mrs Longhurst said legislation, which would apply to all websites, would mean her daughter’s death had not been “entirely in vain”.

Reading West MP Martin Salter, who backed the campaign, said: “This campaign has taken a huge amount of time and effort but it has struck a chord right across the country.

The move by the government would close a legal loophole.

“It is great news that the Government has not only listened but has responded to calls to outlaw access to sickening internet images, which can so easily send vulnerable people over the edge.”

The new law will not target those who accidentally come into contact with obscene pornography or affect mainstream entertainment industry working within current obscenity laws.

But the proposed legislation has drawn opposition from anti-censorship groups and organisations who represent people involved in sadomasochist activities.

Shaun Gabb, director of the anti-censorship organisation the Libertarian Alliance, said: “If you are criminalising possession then you are giving police inquisitorial powers to come into your house and see what you’ve got, now we didn’t have this in the past.”

This year five Law Lords sent Coutts’ case back to the Court of Appeal to “invite that court to quash the conviction”.

It was argued that jurors in the original trial should have been offered the option of manslaughter as well as a murder verdict.

I feel for the mother of the victim. It must be terrible to know that your daughter was killed by a pervert after being used as a piece of meat to fulfil someone’s sexual fantasies, but this ban is a stupid over-reation to a freak incident by the Nanny State. Where does it end? There have been a spate of ‘copy-cat crimes’ throughout history. The Manson family left lyrics from the Beatles ‘White Album’ scrawled in their victims blood. Should the Beatles be banned? In 1984 the Night Stalker, Richard Ramirez killed 18 people, taking his queue from ‘Highway to Hell’. Do we ban AC/DC? More recently, Wolfgang Priklopil kept Natascha Kampusch locked in an underground cell for eight years. His methods certainly seem to have been lifted straight out of John Fowles’ book, ‘Collector’. Just like Fowles’ character Frederick Clegg, Priklopil seized his victim with a van and kept her in total seclusion in a secret subterranean lair, which puts the writer in the frame not only for helping sickos develop unpleasant ideas but also for giving them precise instructions on carrying them out. Do we ban literature? In June 2003 Devin Moore, an 18-year-old who played Grand Theft Auto day and night, shot three policemen then told the officer who arrested him, “Life is like a video game.” Do we ban games? Hmm? In 1994 the makers of ‘Natural Born Killers’ were in a Louisiana Court to defend themselves against dozens of copy-cat incidents including seven murders. Do we ban Hollywood?

Everywhere in popular culture there are references to killing, brutalising, rape, murder, beatings, kidnap. How long before the Government decides we’re not capable of understanding the difference between right and wrong and takes these immoral publications out of our lives?

It has to stop. The Government needs to understand that it isn’t the games, the books, the violent porn internet sites that kill people. People kill people. We live in a society that needs a reality check.


One thought on “Violent porn banned

  1. You got it right. If citizens are acting out what they take in from popular media and entertainment, then the focus should be on why they’re doing that, not on stopping people from having access to it. Something on demand and denied just creates more obsession, more taboo, more ultra-deviance. This will solve nothing. In fact, I think it will make it all worse. (I mean, PlusUngood.)

    And usually when something’s banned, there is a sharp increase in interest for it.

    Like

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